Nutrition Market

Supplements for Good Skin: Boost Your Complexion Naturally

Supplements for Good Skin: Boost Your Complexion Naturally

Introduction

Achieving healthy, radiant skin is a goal for many people, and while a balanced diet, proper hydration, and sun protection are essential, supplements for good skin can also play a vital role. The skin, being the body’s largest organ, requires a variety of nutrients to maintain its health and appearance. Factors such as aging, sun exposure, and diet can all impact skin health, leading to issues like wrinkles, dryness, and uneven skin tone.

Fortunately, research has shown that certain vitamins, minerals, and other compounds, when taken as supplements, can help support skin health from within. These nutrients work by promoting collagen production, reducing inflammation, protecting against UV damage, and more. While supplements should not be seen as a replacement for a healthy lifestyle, they can be a valuable addition to a comprehensive skincare routine.

In this article, we will explore the key vitamins and minerals that have been scientifically proven to benefit skin health, as well as other beneficial compounds like polypodium leucotomos extract, omega-3 fatty acids, and antioxidants from natural sources such as spirulina and chlorella. We will also discuss the importance of consulting with a dermatologist before starting any new supplement regimen and the potential of obtaining these nutrients through a balanced diet rich in plant foods. By understanding the role of supplements in promoting healthy skin, readers can make informed decisions about incorporating these compounds into their skincare routine for a naturally glowing complexion.

Key Vitamins and Minerals for Skin Health

Vitamin A and Beta-Carotene

Vitamin A is a crucial nutrient for maintaining healthy skin. It plays a vital role in the modulation of the immune response and the maintenance of epithelial tissues (Roche & Harris-Tryon, 2021). Deficiency in vitamin A has been linked to increased susceptibility to skin infections and inflammatory skin diseases. Topical vitamin A derivatives, such as retinol, are commonly used in skincare products for their anti-aging effects (Sawada et al., 2022). These compounds help to stimulate collagen production, reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, and improve skin texture and tone.

Beta-carotene, a precursor to vitamin A, is another important nutrient for skin health. As an antioxidant, beta-carotene helps to protect the skin from damage caused by free radicals and oxidative stress (Paiva & Russell, 1999). It also plays a role in reducing hyperpigmentation and evening out skin tone (Bocheva et al., 2022). Good dietary sources of beta-carotene include orange and yellow fruits and vegetables, such as carrots, sweet potatoes, and mangoes.

Vitamin C

Vitamin C is a potent antioxidant that is essential for collagen biosynthesis, the inhibition of melanogenesis, wound healing, and photoprotection (Pullar et al., 2017; Wang et al., 2018). Adequate intake of vitamin C, either through diet or supplementation, can help to maintain skin elasticity, reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, and promote a more even skin tone.

Topical vitamin C serums have gained popularity in recent years for their ability to brighten the complexion and lighten sun-induced dark spots (Zito, 2022). When applied topically, vitamin C can help to stimulate collagen production, reduce inflammation, and protect the skin from damage caused by UV radiation and environmental stressors.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that plays a crucial role in skin health, particularly in the context of skin cancer protection. Low levels of vitamin D have been associated with a higher risk of melanoma (Martín-Gorgojo et al., 2021). A study by Tang et al. (2011) found that supplementation with calcium plus vitamin D may reduce the risk of skin cancer in older adults.

In addition to its potential skin cancer-protective effects, vitamin D has also been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties that may be beneficial for individuals with psoriasis (Soleymani et al., 2015). Vitamin D analogs, such as calcipotriol, are commonly used in the treatment of psoriasis to help reduce inflammation and improve skin appearance.

Vitamin E

Vitamin E is a fat-soluble antioxidant that plays a crucial role in protecting the skin from damage caused by UV radiation and other environmental stressors. Deficiency in vitamin E has been linked to a worsening of skin condition, particularly in the context of photoaging (Thiele & Ekanayake-Mudiyanselage, 2007).

Supplementation with vitamin E, either orally or topically, may be beneficial for individuals with inflammatory skin conditions such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis (Javanbakht et al., 2011; Berardesca & Cameli, 2021). Vitamin E helps to reduce inflammation, improve skin hydration, and protect against further damage caused by oxidative stress.

Other Beneficial Compounds for Skin Health

Polypodium Leucotomos Extract

Polypodium leucotomos is a tropical fern native to Central and South America. Extract from this plant has been shown to have photoprotective, antioxidant, and immunomodulatory properties that may be beneficial for skin health (Parrado et al., 2016).

Oral supplementation with polypodium leucotomos extract has been found to reduce UV-induced skin damage in human studies (Nestor et al., 2015). The extract helps to protect the skin from the harmful effects of UV radiation, reduce inflammation, and promote a more even skin tone.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Omega-3 fatty acids, particularly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are essential for maintaining healthy skin. These fatty acids have potent anti-inflammatory properties that may be beneficial for individuals with inflammatory skin conditions such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and acne (Sawada et al., 2021).

In addition to their anti-inflammatory effects, omega-3 fatty acids have also been shown to protect the skin from damage caused by UV radiation (Thomsen et al., 2020). Adequate intake of omega-3s, either through diet or supplementation, can help to maintain skin hydration, reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, and promote a more even skin tone.

Curcumin

Curcumin is the primary active compound found in turmeric, a spice commonly used in Indian and Middle Eastern cuisine. This compound has potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that may be relevant for skin health (Hewlings & Kalman, 2017).

Oral supplementation with curcumin has been found to improve facial redness in a small study of individuals with moderate to severe facial erythema (Vaughn et al., 2019). Curcumin may also be beneficial for individuals with inflammatory skin conditions such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, although more research is needed to confirm its efficacy.

Astaxanthin

Astaxanthin is a carotenoid pigment found in certain types of algae and seafood, such as salmon and shrimp. This compound has potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that may be beneficial for skin health (Davinelli et al., 2018).

Oral supplementation with astaxanthin has been found to reduce UV-induced skin deterioration in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (Ito et al., 2018). The compound helps to protect the skin from damage caused by UV radiation, reduce inflammation, and improve skin hydration and elasticity.

Spirulina and Chlorella

Spirulina and chlorella are types of microalgae that are rich in antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals. These compounds have been shown to have potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that may be relevant for skin health (Finamore et al., 2017).

Spirulina extract has been found to promote wound healing in animal studies (Liu et al., 2020). The compound helps to stimulate collagen production, reduce inflammation, and promote the growth of new skin cells.

Chlorella supplementation has been shown to reduce atopic dermatitis symptoms in mice (Kang et al., 2015). The compound helps to reduce inflammation, improve skin hydration, and protect against further damage caused by environmental stressors.

Chlorella extract has also been found to protect against UVB-induced skin damage in vitro (Shih & Cherng, 2012). The compound helps to reduce oxidative stress, protect against DNA damage, and promote the growth of healthy skin cells.

Considerations and Precautions

While supplements for good skin show promise for promoting healthy, radiant skin, it is important to note that more research is needed to fully understand the optimal dosing and long-term safety of these compounds, particularly for some of the lesser-studied nutrients.

It is always recommended to consult with a dermatologist or healthcare professional before starting any new supplement regimen, as some supplements may interact with medications or have contraindications for certain health conditions.

It is also important to remember that supplements should not be seen as a replacement for a healthy lifestyle. A balanced diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean proteins can provide many of the essential nutrients needed for healthy skin.

In addition to a healthy diet, proper hydration, regular exercise, and adequate sleep are all important factors in maintaining healthy, radiant skin. Sun protection, including the use of broad-spectrum sunscreen and protective clothing, is also crucial for preventing damage caused by UV radiation.

When selecting supplements for good skin, it is important to choose high-quality products from reputable manufacturers. Look for supplements that have been third-party tested for purity and potency, and always follow the recommended dosage instructions.

It is also important to be patient when starting a new supplement regimen, as it may take several weeks or even months to see noticeable improvements in skin health. Consistency is key, and it is important to maintain a regular skincare routine in addition to taking supplements.

In conclusion, supplements for good skin can be a valuable addition to a comprehensive skincare routine, but they should be used in conjunction with a healthy lifestyle and under the guidance of a healthcare professional. By nourishing the skin from within and protecting it from external stressors, individuals can achieve healthy, radiant skin that glows from the inside out.

Conclusion

In conclusion, a variety of vitamins, minerals, and other beneficial compounds have shown promise in promoting healthy, radiant skin when taken as supplements. Key nutrients like vitamins A, C, D, and E play crucial roles in maintaining skin health by supporting collagen production, reducing inflammation, protecting against UV damage, and more. Other compounds such as polypodium leucotomos extract, omega-3 fatty acids, curcumin, astaxanthin, spirulina, and chlorella have also demonstrated potential benefits for skin health through their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

However, it is important to note that while these supplements show promise, more research is needed to fully understand their optimal dosing and long-term safety, particularly for some of the lesser-studied compounds. Consulting with a dermatologist or healthcare professional before starting any new supplement regimen is always recommended to ensure safety and avoid potential interactions with medications or health conditions. Additionally, supplements should be viewed as a complement to, rather than a replacement for, a healthy lifestyle that includes a balanced diet rich in plant foods, proper hydration, regular exercise, adequate sleep, and sun protection.

Ultimately, achieving and maintaining healthy, glowing skin requires a holistic approach that combines nourishment from within through a balanced diet and targeted supplementation, protection from external stressors like UV radiation, and a consistent skincare routine tailored to individual needs. By understanding the potential role of supplements in promoting skin health and making informed decisions about their use under the guidance of a healthcare professional, individuals can work towards achieving their best possible complexion naturally.

Key Highlights and Actionable Tips

  • Vida Glow’s minimalist, science-backed offering provides skin supplements that defend against skin stressors like seasonal changes, sleep deprivation, pollution, poor diets, and excess sun exposure.
  • AntiGOx is a daily antioxidant supplement that combats inflammation, AGEs, and oxidative stress to prevent premature ageing and preserve skin’s appearance, resilience, and structural health.
  • Incorporating an antioxidant supplement like AntiGOx enhances the body’s ability to defend against harsh UV rays and supports skin tone and texture by reducing free radical damage.
  • Hyaluronic Complex is an ingestible hyaluronic acid supplement that boosts skin moisture levels, fights water loss, and combats skin dryness and dehydration caused by seasonal shifts, ageing, travel, and the use of harsh topicals.
  • Vida Glow’s powerhouse ingestibles prioritise a science-first approach, repairing skin on a cellular level to elicit real results.

How do Vida Glow’s supplements work to repair damaged skin?

Vida Glow’s supplements work to repair damaged skin by targeting the root causes of skin issues at a cellular level. Their science-backed formulations contain potent blends of essential actives that work in synergy to combat inflammation, AGEs (advanced glycation end products), and oxidative stress, which are the three main triggers of premature ageing. By addressing these underlying factors, Vida Glow’s supplements help to preserve skin’s appearance, resilience, and structural health, leading to visible improvements in skin tone, texture, and overall radiance.

Can Vida Glow’s supplements protect against future skin damage?

Yes, Vida Glow’s supplements can help protect against future skin damage by enhancing the body’s natural defence mechanisms. For example, their AntiGOx supplement is a powerful antioxidant that defends against free radical damage caused by UV rays, pollution, and other environmental stressors. By incorporating AntiGOx into your daily beauty routine, you can boost your skin’s ability to withstand these harmful factors, preventing the formation of fine lines, wrinkles, and uneven skin tone over time.

How do Vida Glow’s supplements compare to topical skin repair products?

Vida Glow’s supplements offer a unique advantage over topical skin repair products by working from the inside out. While topical products can provide temporary relief and superficial improvements, they often struggle to penetrate deep into the skin’s layers to address the root causes of damage. In contrast, Vida Glow’s ingestible supplements deliver essential nutrients and actives directly into the bloodstream, allowing them to reach the skin’s deeper layers and promote healing and repair at a cellular level. This holistic approach leads to more profound and long-lasting results that topical products alone cannot achieve.

How long does it take to see results from using Vida Glow’s supplements?

The time it takes to see results from using Vida Glow’s supplements can vary depending on individual factors such as age, lifestyle, and the severity of skin damage. However, many users report noticeable improvements in skin hydration, texture, and radiance within 4-8 weeks of consistent use. To maximise results, it’s essential to take the supplements as directed and maintain a healthy lifestyle that includes a balanced diet, regular exercise, and sun protection. Keep in mind that repairing damaged skin is a gradual process, and consistent, long-term use of Vida Glow’s supplements will yield the most significant benefits.

Can Vida Glow’s supplements be used alongside other skincare products?

Yes, Vida Glow’s supplements can be safely used alongside other skincare products as part of a comprehensive skincare routine. In fact, combining Vida Glow’s ingestible supplements with topical products can lead to enhanced results, as the supplements work to repair and strengthen the skin from the inside while the topical products nourish and protect the skin’s surface. However, it’s always a good idea to consult with a healthcare professional or skincare specialist before introducing new products into your routine, especially if you have sensitive skin or pre-existing skin conditions.

References

Berardesca, E., & Cameli, N. (2021). Vitamin E supplementation in inflammatory skin diseases. Dermatologic Therapy, 34(6), e15160. https://doi.org/10.1111/dth.15160

Bocheva, G., Slominski, R. M., Janjetovic, Z., Kim, T.-K., & Böhm, M. (2022). Protective Role of Melatonin and Its Metabolites in Skin Aging. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 23(3), 1238. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23031238

Davinelli, S., Nielsen, M. E., & Scapagnini, G. (2018). Astaxanthin in Skin Health, Repair, and Disease: A Comprehensive Review. Nutrients, 10(4), 522. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10040522

Finamore, A., Palmery, M., Bensehaila, S., & Peluso, I. (2017). Antioxidant, Immunomodulating, and Microbial-Modulating Activities of the Sustainable and Ecofriendly Spirulina. Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, 2017, 3247528. https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3247528

Hewlings, S. J., & Kalman, D. S. (2017). Curcumin: A Review of Its Effects on Human Health. Foods, 6(10), 92. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods6100092

Ito, N., Seki, S., & Ueda, F. (2018). The Protective Role of Astaxanthin for UV-Induced Skin Deterioration in Healthy People-A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial. Nutrients, 10(7), 817. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10070817

Javanbakht, M. H., Keshavarz, S. A., Djalali, M., Siassi, F., & Eshraghian, M. R. (2011). Randomized controlled trial using vitamins E and D supplementation in atopic dermatitis. Journal of Dermatological Treatment, 22(3), 144–150. https://doi.org/10.3109/09546630903578566

Martín-Gorgojo, A., Gilaberte, Y., & Nagore, E. (2021). Vitamin D and Skin Cancer: An Epidemiological Patient-Centered Update and Review. Nutrients, 13(12), 4472. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13124472

Nestor, M. S., Berman, B., & Swenson, N. (2015). Safety and Efficacy of Oral Polypodium Leucotomos Extract in Healthy Adult Subjects. The Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology, 8(2), 19–23. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4345927/

Paiva, S. A., & Russell, R. M. (1999). Beta-carotene and other carotenoids as antioxidants. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 18(5), 426–433. https://doi.org/10.1080/07315724.1999.10718880

Parrado, C., Mascaraque, M., Gilaberte, Y., Juarranz, A., & Gonzalez, S. (2016). Fernblock (Polypodium leucotomos Extract): Molecular Mechanisms and Pleiotropic Effects in Light-Related Skin Conditions, Photoaging and Skin Cancers, a Review. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 17(7), 1026. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms17071026

Pullar, J. M., Carr, A. C., & Vissers, M. C. M. (2017). The Roles of Vitamin C in Skin Health. Nutrients, 9(8), 866. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu9080866

Roche, F. C., & Harris-Tryon, T. A. (2021). Illuminating the Role of Vitamin A in Skin Innate Immunity and the Skin Microbiome: A Narrative Review. Nutrients, 13(2), 302. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020302

Sawada, Y., Saito-Sasaki, N., & Nakamura, M. (2021). Omega 3 Fatty Acid and Skin Diseases. Frontiers in Immunology, 11, 623052. https://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2020.623052

Sawada, Y., Saito-Sasaki, N., & Nakamura, M. (2022). Vitamin A in Skin and Hair: An Update. Nutrients, 14(14), 2952. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14142952

Soleymani, T., Hung, T., & Soung, J. (2015). The role of vitamin D in psoriasis: A review. International Journal of Dermatology, 54(4), 383–392. https://doi.org/10.1111/ijd.12790

Tang, J. Y., Fu, T., LeBlanc, E., Manson, J. E., Feldman, D., Linos, E., Vitolins, M. Z., Zeitouni, N. C., Larson, J., & Stefanick, M. L. (2011). Calcium Plus Vitamin D Supplementation and the Risk of Nonmelanoma and Melanoma Skin Cancer: Post Hoc Analyses of the Women’s Health Initiative Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 29(22), 3078–3084. https://doi.org/10.1200/JCO.2011.34.5967

Thiele, J. J., & Ekanayake-Mudiyanselage, S. (2007). Vitamin E in human skin: Organ-specific physiology and considerations for its use in dermatology. Molecular Aspects of Medicine, 28(5–6), 646–667. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mam.2007.06.001

Thomsen, B. J., Chow, E. Y., & Sapijaszko, M. J. (2020). The Potential Uses of Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Dermatology: A Review. Journal of Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery, 24(5), 481–494. https://doi.org/10.1177/1203475420929925

Vaughn, A. R., Pourang, A., Clark, A. K., Burney, W., & Sivamani, R. K. (2019). Dietary Supplementation with Turmeric Polyherbal Formulation Decreases Facial Redness: A Randomized Double-Blind Controlled Pilot Study. Journal of Integrative Medicine, 17(1), 20–23. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joim.2018.11.004

Wang, K., Jiang, H., Li, W., Qiang, M., Dong, T., & Li, H. (2018). Role of Vitamin C in Skin Diseases. Frontiers in Physiology, 9, 819. https://doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2018.00819

Zito, P. M. (2022). Vitamin C. In StatPearls. StatPearls Publishing. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK499877/



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